Jump to content


Photo

How to make a furred out wall?


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Jonathan Verduzco

Jonathan Verduzco

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • LocationCorpus Christi, TX

Posted 07 July 2021 - 07:24 AM

Hello everyone

I was wondering how to go about showing a furred out wall in softplan. In the living room, I want a 2x4 wall furred out 6” which is essentially having a 2x6 wall in front of the 2x4 wall, if that makes sense. This furred out wall will serve to have an electric fireplace. I’ve tried using a custom wall definition but Had some complications making it look good in 3D mode and on the drawing. I don’t know if there is an easier way. Thank you all in advance for your time.

#2 Mark Petri

Mark Petri

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,059 posts
  • LocationEvergreen, CO

Posted 07 July 2021 - 08:34 AM

If it is furred only for a segment of the wall behind, then best to make it 3 walls that are drawn more like a fireplace chase would be drawn. To keep walls joining properly adjust the wall join tolerances. The return walls may initially have to be drawn longer, then moved into place and adjusted.


  • ROBERT BROGAN and STEPHAN PAGE like this

Mark Petri

Petri Building and Design

 


#3 Joseph Smith

Joseph Smith

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 668 posts
  • LocationWI

Posted 07 July 2021 - 09:05 AM

At times i use a furring wall by the tub.  Strange things happen with join tolerance so I have to reduce down to 1/2" then all is fine.

 

You can create a new thicker wall then add a 'none' line at the correct spot to simulate where your furring occurs. (third image)..watch the join tolerance, might have issues connecting properly.

 

sorry my explanation might be terrible.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Capture.PNG
  • Capture2.PNG
  • Capture3.PNG

  • Steven Wohlgemuth, Allen McDonnell, ROBERT BROGAN and 1 other like this

Joseph A. Smith

http://granitedesigngroup.com

 


#4 Jonathan Verduzco

Jonathan Verduzco

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • LocationCorpus Christi, TX

Posted 07 July 2021 - 01:18 PM

If it is furred only for a segment of the wall behind, then best to make it 3 walls that are drawn more like a fireplace chase would be drawn. To keep walls joining properly adjust the wall join tolerances. The return walls may initially have to be drawn longer, then moved into place and adjusted.


Understood, thanks for this suggestion Mark!

#5 Jonathan Verduzco

Jonathan Verduzco

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • LocationCorpus Christi, TX

Posted 07 July 2021 - 01:19 PM

At times i use a furring wall by the tub. Strange things happen with join tolerance so I have to reduce down to 1/2" then all is fine.

You can create a new thicker wall then add a 'none' line at the correct spot to simulate where your furring occurs. (third image)..watch the join tolerance, might have issues connecting properly.

sorry my explanation might be terrible.


Oh okay I can try this also. Thanks for the suggestion Joseph!!!

#6 Keith Almond

Keith Almond

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,567 posts
  • LocationBrockville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 07 July 2021 - 06:51 PM

I'd actually design a wall that has two sets of studs. Not sure why it wouldn't work in the 3D. Draw it like you'd build it


  • Rick Kingsbury, Mike Adams, Allen McDonnell and 2 others like this
Keith

There are 10 types of people in this world ....... Those who understand binary, and those who don't.

Softplan user since version 5.5.2.5

www.homehardwarekingston.ca

#7 Mark Petri

Mark Petri

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,059 posts
  • LocationEvergreen, CO

Posted 08 July 2021 - 11:05 AM

It'd be nice if we could have a wall with 2 sets of studs and stop the inner (furred) set at a certain point and end cap it with whatever finishes we want, but that doesn't typically work well. So, I use 3 walls with drywall or finishes on the interior side and adjust them to fit up against the main wall to create the "chase" or furred section as needed. Of course, technically you wouldn't have interior finishes on the wall where that furred section is either. So, then do you cut the wall behind into sections so you can use a definition without interior finishes where furred? Or, go back to Keith's method of a double wall for just that section, plus at finishes to the ends of the furred part? It becomes a bit of work to get the look and representation one wants depending on what the need is. If for rendering it can be way simplified. If for accuracy of a build, it leaves something off or includes some work-arounds to get it showing and representing correctly. Lots of ways to do it, just gotta figure out what works best for you and your project.


Mark Petri

Petri Building and Design

 


#8 Jonathan Verduzco

Jonathan Verduzco

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • LocationCorpus Christi, TX

Posted 08 July 2021 - 03:53 PM

It'd be nice if we could have a wall with 2 sets of studs and stop the inner (furred) set at a certain point and end cap it with whatever finishes we want, but that doesn't typically work well. So, I use 3 walls with drywall or finishes on the interior side and adjust them to fit up against the main wall to create the "chase" or furred section as needed. Of course, technically you wouldn't have interior finishes on the wall where that furred section is either. So, then do you cut the wall behind into sections so you can use a definition without interior finishes where furred? Or, go back to Keith's method of a double wall for just that section, plus at finishes to the ends of the furred part? It becomes a bit of work to get the look and representation one wants depending on what the need is. If for rendering it can be way simplified. If for accuracy of a build, it leaves something off or includes some work-arounds to get it showing and representing correctly. Lots of ways to do it, just gotta figure out what works best for you and your project.


Yes I tried Making a wall definition and couldn’t finish off the ends and it also didn’t look great for the blueprint. At that time, I just went with drawing a box the thickness of the stud and inserting the fireplace into it to give it a cleaner representation for the blueprint. In the future I want to work with 3D renderings and was wondering if there was an easier way.

#9 Allen McDonnell

Allen McDonnell

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 760 posts

Posted 08 July 2021 - 04:32 PM

I'd actually design a wall that has two sets of studs. Not sure why it wouldn't work in the 3D. Draw it like you'd build it

Every. day. Period.  No models that look like         on the inside.


Computer Specs:

CPU: AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX

GPU: EVGA GeForce RTX 3090 FTW3 ULTRA

Motherboard: Asus ROG Zenith Extreme Alpha

RAM: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 64GB

SSD: Samsung (1) 970 Evo Plus NVMe M.2 1TB, (2) 970 Evo NVMe M.2 2TB

Powersupply: Asus ROG Thor

Mouse: Logitech G Pro Wireless

Keyboard: Logitech G513 Carbon Linear

 

Primary Monitor: Asus ProArt PA32UC

 

Software:

Softplan 2022+

Lumion 11 Pro

Photoshop 2021

 

Work flow.  SP--L--PS


#10 ROBERT BROGAN

ROBERT BROGAN

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts

Posted 11 July 2021 - 02:11 PM

3D  cube ?  You can modify dimensions/change textures/ etc...

 

you wont be crucified by the framer for missing 4 studs amd 3 plated in softlist.

 

bob.



#11 Jonathan Verduzco

Jonathan Verduzco

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • LocationCorpus Christi, TX

Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:44 PM

3D cube ? You can modify dimensions/change textures/ etc...

you wont be crucified by the framer for missing 4 studs amd 3 plated in softlist.

bob.


Right on!! That’s perfect for the 2D drawing and 3D! Thanks Robert!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users